Tag-Archive for ◊ contra ◊

• Saturday, August 31st, 2013

AUBURN NY - Invitation to dance! Contra dance with Casey Mullaney and the O’Shanigans Fri Sep 6th 5-8 pm http://www.oshanigans.org/ On September 6, the Schweinfurth Memorial Arts Center will be celebrating First Friday with a special Fall Folk Arts Festival. This event will feature traditional regional dances and crafts that celebrate dance, autumn and the harvest. Demonstrating visual artists will be set up throughout the Arts Center galleries to interact with visitors to the Fall Exhibition, Fertile Imagination: Art & Agriculture. Interactive dance performances will take place at Theater Mack adjacent to the Arts Center.

You don’t need to be a dancer to dance. Contra dance events are and family-friendly and open to all, regardless of experience. Everyone is invited to join! A caller will walk you through the steps and figures for each dance.

Contra dance is an American dance tradition, based on European predecessors brought to the Americas in the 18th century. It is similar to the English Country line dances you can see in Jane Austen movies, and related to other partner-changing dances throughout the continent, from square dance to Jamaican quadrille and Cuban rueda. During the 19th century, these line dances were often replaced by newer couple dances such as waltz and polka, but contra lived on in pockets of rural New England until it underwent a nationwide revival in the mid-20th century. Today, contra dancing is a vital part of American musical life together with the string band music that usually accompanies it. Contra dances take place every weekend in Fayetteville and elsewhere in Central New York.

The band - The O’Shanigans are Phil Robinson (guitar), Tim Ball (fiddle) and Michael Ludgate (mandolin and banjo). Since 2009 they have been one of most sought-after contra dance bands in Ithaca, also playing for weddings and open jams in Central New York and beyond. All three members are multi-instrumentalists with a strong family heritage of musicianship, and each brings their own, unique perspective to the group stemming from their backgrounds in music as diverse as rock, jazz, Irish, and barbershop. Their repertoire combines old-time tunes with Celtic, American and “world” fiddle influences, and their sense of musical humor makes them a favorite with contra dancers in our region. http://www.oshanigans.org/

The Caller - Casey Mullaney will be calling the dance. She began calling while a student at Hartwick College in Oneonta and has since worked with the O’Shanigans on several occasions.. Known for her clear, skillful instruction and her warm and friendly style, Mulaney is an up and coming talent in central and upstate New York.

source: http://www.schweinfurthartcenter.org/events/current.html see also: http://www.schweinfurthartcenter.org/events/folk.html

organizer & main venue
Schweinfurth Memorial Art Center
205 Genesee St, Auburn NY 13021

dance venue
Theater Mack at the Cayuga Museum
203 Genesee Street, Auburn, NY 13021

Fall Folk Arts Festival - Summary

Although in the northern hemisphere fall officially begins only on September 22, this year the Schweinfurth Art Center will commemorate its arrival early. The Fall Folk Arts Festival is part of SMAC’s first Friday event series, which is sponsored in 2013 by the Auburn’s Historic & Cultural Sites Commission, the Auburn Downtown Business Improvement District, Columbian Foundation, Inc., and Everett Charitable Trust.

Traditionally, fall is the time to celebrate the harvest, and many people do so by dancing. To accompany the Schweinfurth’s current exhibit, Fertile Imagination: Art & Agriculture, we invited artists from many parts of the world to demonstrate their arts. Each makes objects related to dance traditions and using natural materials :

• Evelyn S. Cassano makes hair ornaments that represent flowers and animals for Panamanian dancing
• Habiba Hassan weaves baskets and plates used in serving food and makes necklaces worn for dancing, especially for the sharraro dance.
• Iryna Juravich makes traditional beaded jewelry and weaves belts used for Ukrainian dances
• Jahbad Kerow makes Somali Bantu musical instruments played for rituals, weddings, and harvest festivals
• Sherri Hopper-Waterman makes dance regalia for Haudenosaunee dances.

Other events around town …

First Friday Program (September 6)
A.T. WALLEY’S Drinks Specials
Date: September 6
Time: 4 - 6PM
Location: 119 Genesee Street
Details: Patrons can enjoy $3 domestic beers and $5 specialty cocktails during happy hour. 315.282-7314 www.ATWALLEY.com https://twitter.com/ATWalley

BEAUTIFUL THINGS hosts Open House
Date: September 6
Time: 5 - 7PM
Location: 6 Seminary Avenue, next to Bee Line Auto
Details: Tour this antique & collectibles shop open Wednesday – Saturday 10AM – 7PM. 315.702-8273

Finger Lakes ARTIST CO-OP features ART & MUSIC
Date: September 6
Time: 5 - 8PM
Location: 101 Genesee Street
Details: Meet & greet the co-op artists who showcase their fine art & crafts, plus live music with Richard “Butch” Chaffee, a wine tasting, refreshments and demonstrations.
Free Professor Walter K. Long print “Fall’s Last Curtain Call,” with a purchase of $25+!
315.406-0097 www.flartcoop.org

MAFFEI’S Office offers ART Exhibit Reception
Date: September 6
Time: Monday – Friday 9AM – 5PM
Location: Congressman Maffei’s office, 30 Dill Street
Details: Come enjoy the work of a featured local artist. For more info call 315.253-4176 or email ian.phillips@mail.house.gov.

MATCHBOX offers DISCOUNTS
Date: September 6
Time: 12 – 8PM
Location: 41 Genesee Street
Details: Enjoy $20 off the price of your tattoo, $10 off piercings and $5 off of allclothing items. 315.252-8020 http://matchboxtattoo.com/

FOOD & DRINK Specials at McMURPHY’S Irish Pub
Date: September 6
Time: 4 – 10PM
Location: Holiday Inn, 75 North Street
Details: Try the new “Ultimate Irish Burger,” burger, bun & all, beer battered & served with waffle fries. Also featuring a “Beer Shamrock”with two soft pretzel sticks & Coleman’s mustard sauce. 315.253-4531 http://www.mcmurphyspub.com/

SCHWEINFURTH Art Center features FOLK ARTS Festival
Date: September 6
Time: 5 - 8PM
Location: 203 & 205 Genesee Street & Theater Mack
Details: Special event featuring traditional dance & crafts to celebrate the harvest. Refreshments served, free and open to the public. 315.255-1553 http://www.schweinfurthartcenter.org/

SEWARD HOUSE Museum features ART & MUSIC
Date: September 6
Time: 5 - 8PM
Location: 33 South Street
Details: Featuring live solo performance by Cristofe Chabot in the garden, showcasing renditions of traditional, folk & classic rock. Featured gallery artist is photographer Dan Marquart, whose works highlights the natural beauty of the Finger Lakes Region.Refreshments & tours. 315.252-1283 http://www.sewardhouse.org/

Back to School CRAFTS at SEYMOUR PUBLIC LIBRARY
Date: September 6
Time: 5 - 8PM
Location: 176-178 Genesee Street
Details: Children are invited to make a back-to-school scrapbook. All library services available until 8PM. 315.252-2571 http://www.seymourlibrary.org/

SWABY’S TAVERN offers SPECIALS
Date: September 6
Time: 4 - 10PM
Location: 6 South Street
Details: Swaby’s kitchen will be serving half-price burgers, plus drinks specials.
315.252-5400 http://www.swabystavern.com/

Try the Y for FREE on FIRST FRIDAY!
Date: September 6
Time: 5AM – 9:30PM
Location: Auburn YMCA-WEIU, 27 William Street
Details: Come enjoy the YMCA’s facility and services for no charge, includingfitness/aquatic classes, weight and cardio equipment or play racquetball orbasketball. Just sign-in at the front desk & receive a goody bag! 315.253-5304 http://www.auburnymca.org

Contra dance with Casey Mullaney and O’Shanigans Fri Sep 6th 5-8 pm
http://www.oshanigans.org/

The O’Shanigans are Phil Robinson (guitar), Tim Ball (fiddle) and Michael Ludgate (mandolin and banjo). Since 2009 they have been one of most sought-after contra dance bands in Ithaca, also playing for weddings and open jams in Central New York and beyond. All three members are multi-instrumentalists with a strong family heritage of musicianship, and each brings their own, unique perspective to the group stemming from their backgrounds in music as diverse as rock, jazz, Irish, and barbershop. Their repertoire combines old-time tunes with Celtic, American and “world” fiddle influences, and their sense of musical humor makes them a favorite with contra dancers in our region. http://www.oshanigans.org/

Casey Mullaney will be calling the dance. She began calling while a student at Hartwick College in Oneonta and has since worked with the O’Shanigans on several occasions. Known for her clear, skillful instruction and her warm and friendly style, Mulaney is an up and coming talent in central and upstate New York.

DEMONSTRATING ARTISTS

Evelyn S. Cassano

Evelyn Cassano is artistic director and co-founder of the dance group “Panameños en Rochester,” as well as founder of “Grupo Cultural Latinos En Rochester”, a group which aims to share Latin American culture and folklore trough dance and community service. Today she is joined by her mother, Cecilia Domínguez De Sasso, who is visiting from Panama. Evelyn learned to dance as a child in Panama, where she was specially selected and trained to perform in Independence Day celebrations as a representative of her town of La Chorrera. When Evelyn moved to Rochester in 2006, she joined with other Panamanians to form a group to teach traditional dances to their children. However, the high cost of the hair ornaments called tembleques put them out of reach for the group’s 35 members. Thus, Evelyn and Cecilia learned to make their own by consulting with friends, neighbors, and internet contacts, and through years of trial and error. Tembleques are worn to perform many of Panama’s dances, like cumbia, tamborito, and punto.

Habiba Hassan

Habiba from the Somali Bantu refugee community weaves baskets and other objects (plates for food, parts of dance costumes) as well as necklaces used for dance costumes.

Habiba Hassan, originally from Juba, Somalia, learned weaving and embroidery from her mother as a child. Years later, when living in a UN refugee camp in Kenya, she decided to sell home-made baskets and other woven objects to generate income for her family. Soon she taught her skills to other women and ran a successful business in the camp, which continued after she and her family left for the United States, where she has resided with her family since 2007. In Syracuse, Ms. Hassan continues her activities as a master artisan, teaching children to dye and weave with natural fibers. She also crochets and embroiders textiles with expressive floral ornaments in bright, primary colors that decorate the walls and ceilings of Bantu homes like hers, and makes glass-bead necklaces, belts, and bracelets called fiin. They are worn for dancing and important occasions like births and marriages and are passed down from mother to daughter.

http://asnews.syr.edu/newsevents_2012/releases/somali_bantu_story_su_magazine.html

Iryna Juravich

Iryna Juravich, originally from the Lviv region of western Ukraine, makes traditional Ukrainian beadwork and woven belts. Her belts are handmade from start to finish – she even raises her own sheep, alpacas, angora goats and rabbits at her home in Oneida. While she started weaving and beading only recently, these crafts are an extension of the cross-stich work she learned from her family as a child and use many of the same motifs and symbols, like the Catholic cross, ram or deer horns, pine trees, bells, roses, and oats. These items were traditionally worn as part of women’s festive or Sunday dress, and here are used for costumes to perform regional dances like Hutsul, Kolomiyka, Arkan, Volyn, or Hopak. Also a violinist and music teacher, she has lived in Central New York for 18 years and her three children are part of the Odesa Ukrainian Dance Ensemble of Syracuse.

Jahbad Kerow

Jahbad Kerow is a musician and instrument maker from Bu’ale, Somalia who came to Syracuse in September 2004 because of the civil war in his country. He has played the shareero (also sharrara), a stringed instrument from East Africa, almost as long as he can remember. It is usually accompanied by a long, cylindrical, single-headed drum called the tabul and sometimes by a wooden clapper called shambal. Mr Kerow learned to make these instruments in the US because there were not enough instruments available to play the musical genre called shareero. Today, Mr. Kerow performs together with his band in Syracuse and elsewhere Central New York. Shareero music is often accompanied by dance, which is also called shareero. Traditionally, shareero is performed to heal sick people, especially if they are believed to be possessed by evil spirits. Music with drums is also used for celebrations like weddings and the harvest.

Sherri Waterman-Hopper

Sherri Waterman-Hopper is a member of the Beaver Clan of the Onondaga Nation. Over 20 years ago, Ms. Waterman-Hopper formed the Haudenosaunee Singers and Dancers with her children as a way of educating audiences about Haudenosaunee culture and history. She is well-known for the dance regalia she creates for herself and others, an art she learned from her mother by helping to create the clothing the family wore for dancing at fairs. Since then, she has come to research historical and contemporary traditional dress, and has also learned pottery and jewelry making, creating silver brooches in 18th and 19th century Iroquois styles. Ms. Waterman-Hopper has also served on the Advisory Council for the Iroquois Museum, and as board member of the North American Indian Club in Syracuse and Team Iroquois Lacrosse.

Fall Folk Arts Festival - Summary

Although in the northern hemisphere fall officially begins only on September 22, this year the Schweinfurth Art Center will commemorate its arrival early. The Fall Folk Arts Festival is part of SMAC’s first Friday event series, which is sponsored in 2013 by the Auburn’s Historic & Cultural Sites Commission, the Auburn Downtown Business Improvement District, Columbian Foundation, Inc., and Everett Charitable Trust.

Traditionally, fall is the time to celebrate the harvest, and many people do so by dancing. To accompany the Schweinfurth’s current exhibit, Fertile Imagination: Art & Agriculture, we invited artists from many parts of the world to demonstrate their arts. Each makes objects related to dance traditions and using natural materials :

• Evelyn S. Cassano makes hair ornaments that represent flowers and animals for Panamanian dancing
• Habiba Hassan weaves baskets and plates used in serving food and makes necklaces worn for dancing, especially for the sharraro dance.
• Iryna Juravich makes traditional beaded jewelry and weaves belts used for Ukrainian dances
• Jahbad Kerow makes Somali Bantu musical instruments played for rituals, weddings, and harvest festivals
• Sherri Hopper-Waterman makes dance regalia for Haudenosaunee dances.

We also invite everyone to take part in a contra dance today.

Invitation to dance! Contra dance with Casey Mullaney and the O’Shanigans http://www.oshanigans.org/

You don’t need to be a dancer to dance. Contra dance events are and family-friendly and open to all, regardless of experience. Everyone is invited to join! A caller will walk you through the steps and figures for each dance.

Contra dance is an American dance tradition, based on European predecessors brought to the Americas in the 18th century. It is similar to the English Country line dances you can see in Jane Austen movies, and related to other partner-changing dances throughout the continent, from square dance to Jamaican quadrille and Cuban rueda. During the 19th century, these line dances were often replaced by newer couple dances such as waltz and polka, but contra lived on in pockets of rural New England until it underwent a nationwide revival in the mid-20th century. Today, contra dancing is a vital part of American musical life together with the string band music that usually accompanies it. Contra dances take place every weekend in Fayetteville and elsewhere in Central New York. Performing artists and demonstrating artists are sponsored by NYSCA. http://www.oshanigans.org/

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• Monday, May 20th, 2013

ITHACA NY - Notes Inégales for a traditional, old New England style Contra Dance on Fri May 24th. Notes Inégales [pronounced notes in-a-gall] is Andrea Katz on fiddle and Michael Ludgate on mandolin. For this dance featuring special musical guests: Laurie Tupper on flute and Tim Ball on guitar. Caller: House callers. Location: Bethel Grove Community Center 1825 Slaterville Rd Ithaca NY. 8-11 pm $6- TCCD sponsored event. Band: www.notesinegales.org FB event https://www.facebook.com/events/441495482607316/

Andrea Katz (fiddle, viola) - Andrea Katz (from Texas on playing fiddle and viola) is a PhD candidate in applied physics at Cornell University (finishing her 2nd year there). Andrea played in a variety of contra dance bands in the San Antonio area and has studied with Jay Ungar and David Kaynor. Andrea is joined by Michael Ludgate (mandolin, fiddle, tenor banjo), joined by occasional special guests. Both are fantastic contra dance musicians and are playing a dance with Ithaca contra musician and music promoter Michael Ludgate under the new band name Notes Inégales. This will be an exceptionally fun dance!

Laurie Tupper (flute) - Laurie Tupper is also a graduate student at Cornell University, moving here from Swarthmore College. Laurie is well know in contra dance circles as the flute player for “Last Exit” a Philly based band. She has played all around the northeastern US. She is also the flute player for “Stunt Double” contra band. More here http://tedcrane.com/DanceDB/DisplayIdent.com?key=LAURIE_TUPPER

Tim Ball (guitar) - Tim has recently been perfecting a style of guitar playing that is great for Irish sessions and contra dancing. Most folks know him for his fiddling: Tim plays fiddle with Contrapasso, Tunescape, the O’Shanigans, and other fine musicians for contra and English Country dances around upstate New York and beyond. A recent graduate of the Ithaca College School of Music where he studied violin with Susan Waterbury, he brings training in classical music and jazz improvisation together with a love of social dancing and a great respect for the traditional music of New England, Ireland, Quebec, and the many other regions that have lent their influence to contra dance musicians everywhere. http://tedcrane.com/DanceDB/DisplayIdent.com?key=TIM_BALL

Notes Inégales (pronounced notes in-a-gall) contra dance band performs Celtic, American and world fiddle tunes suitable for contra dancing,  general entertainment and weddings. Fiddle and dance tunes from: New England, Southern Appalachia, Canada, Ireland, Scotland, England, France, Finland, Sweden and the Middle East! We currently combine the skills of two of Ithaca’s most talented contra dance musicians: Andrea Katz (fiddle, viola) with local contra session leader and acoustic music promoter, Michael Ludgate (mandolin, fiddle, tenor banjo), joined by occasional special guests.

From the dancers and callers –  Notes Inégales, what a fantastic band! You guys rock! True to it’s name, the band infused some interesting rhythmic swing-like patterns (rock step-1-2-3??) into regular square steps. Thanks guys for a fun evening!” “A wall of dance sound” “Wow! What was that Horse Flies tune you played?” “The music was fantastic!” “That was a delightful contra dance last night … I truly enjoyed the many subtleties of your musical arrangements.”, ” … such a fun group of people, and the band was awesome … ” , “The band was absolutely wonderful last night!”

Notes Inégales - About the band name: “Notes Inégales(pronounced notes inagall) contra dance band http://www.notesinegales.org/ — “In music, notes inégales (French: unequal notes) refers to a performance practice, mainly from the Baroque and Classical music eras, in which some notes with equal written time values are performed with unequal durations, usually as alternating long and short. The practice was especially prevalent in France in the 17th and 18th centuries, with appearances in other European countries at the same time; and it reappeared as the standard performance practice in the 20th century in jazz.” source http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notes_in%C3%A9gales

More about the musicians here: Bios and Photos www.notesinegales.org

More about Contra Dancing:

WHAT TO EXPECT AT YOUR FIRST DANCE Contra dancing is easy to learn. It’s so easy to learn that you don’t take lessons. Just show up at a dance and by the end of the first night you’ll have learned Danceers at an O’Shanigans’ contra dance in Ithaca NYall the dance moves and you will be able to enjoy the next dance even more. People are friendly and welcoming to beginners. The age range is from kids to folks that have been around for a while. Both singles and doubles come to contra dances and women as well as men ask people to dance. It is usual that you change partners after every dance. You will meet people in a relaxed, pleasant, smoke and alcohol free atmosphere. The patterns of the dance can be a tad confusing at first but remember everyone had a first time and that other dancers will help you. Listen to the caller and the music and go with the flow of the dance. Some people find they get dizzy at first. Looking directly at the person you are dancing with eliminates this sensation. For many, the music is what keeps them coming back as it is exciting and lively. People come to dance, hear the music, socialize and have a good time.

WHAT TO WEAR? Wear smooth soled shoes and comfortable light weight clothing. Some halls require non-street shoes so make sure the soles of shoes aren’t bringing grit onto the dance floor. Most people bring a bottle of drinking water. Contra dancing is joyous so it’s important that you bring a smile. Adapted from http://www.greatmeadowmusic.com/music.html

More information about contra dancing at these links:

http://canaaninstitute.org/mn/mus_dance.html
https://www.facebook.com/groups/cny.contradance/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contra_dance
http://tedcrane.com/DanceDB/DisplayDance.com/US_NY_ITH_TCCD
http://tedcrane.com/DanceDB/DisplayBand.com?key=OSHANIGANS
http://hands4dancers.org/
http://www.syracusecountrydancers.org/
http://contra.binghamtondance.org/contra_calendar.htm
http://www.thedancegypsy.com/
http://www.thedancegypsy.com/performerList.php?band=Oshanigans
http://www.sbcds.org/contradance/whatis/

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Author: Margaret
• Thursday, October 11th, 2012

Hands Four Contra Dance with Wild Asparagus and George Marshall Calling

Saturday, 20 October

4-6 pm dance for experienced dancers;

6:15 pm potluck supper;

7:30 pm beginners’ workshop;

8-11 pm dancing for all

Beverly Martin Elementary School,

302 W. Buffalo St., Ithaca

Dance bliss is guaranteed with the return of renowned caller George Marshall and Wild Asparagus. Springing up in the heart of the Pioneer (aka Asparagus) Valley of Massachusetts in the 1980s, the acclaimed band WILD ASPARAGUS has been pivotal in the contra dance renaissance. Their monthly “first-Saturdays” at Greenfield are packed. Over the years, these first-rate musicians have put their individual stamp on traditional tunes from New England, Canada, the wider Celtic world, and beyond, recognized for their imaginative arrangements and dynamic pacing. Beyond skill, their playing is playful. After too long an absence, this fabulous band will bring its unique blend of instruments, creativity, and energy to Ithaca for a “Don’t miss!” event.

Ann Percival, on dazzling piano, guitar, and vocals, is the essential heartbeat of the band; David Cantieni, woodwind wizard, provides melody and joyous flow with flutes, tin whistle, oboe, saxophone, and bombard. George Marshall, gifted at English concertina, bodhran, and bones, brings drive and does double duty as a suave caller. Becky Tracy, of Nightingale fame, fiddles with a rare match of fire and beauty. Ithaca’s own Harry Aceto will build the solid bass foundation for the musical dynamics.

Prices (Hands Four member/nonmember): both sessions $16/20; afternoon only $8/10; evening only $10/12). Join or renew at the dance and receive the discounted admission. Beginners are most welcome: steps are simple and each dance is taught. No need to bring a partner. Please bring clean, soft-soled shoes to protect the floor! For more information, visit www.hands4dancers.org or call 607/539-3174.

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• Thursday, June 21st, 2012

ITHACA NY Fri Jun 29 2012 — Contra Dance with Notes Inégales (pronounced notes inagall) at Bethel Grove. Ethan Jodziewicz (guitar, bass, banjo and feet) and Andrea Katz (fiddle) along with Michael Ludgate

(mandolin) at Bethel Grove Community Center. Calling the dances will be local favorite Pamela Goddard. All at 1825 Slaterville Road (Rt 79 about 4 miles east of Ithaca) Ithaca NY from 8-11 pm. Admission $6- Sponsored by: TCCD - Tompkins County Country. http://www.notesinegales.org/

Facebook event https://www.facebook.com/events/146715998785801/

We are lucky to have two new contra dance musicians now living in the Ithaca area, both are students starting well into their second semesters here. Ethan Jodziewicz (bass, guitar, banjo, mandolin and feet) is studying double bass performance at Ithaca College. Ethan is from Washington state, where he often plays with his band The Retrospectacles. Andrea Katz (from Texas on playing fiddle) is a PhD candidate in applied physics at Cornell University. Andrea played in a variety of contra dance bands in the San Antonio area and has studied with Jay Ungar and David Kaynor. Both are fantastic contra dance musicians and are playing a dance with local contra musician and music promoter Michael Ludgate under the new band name Notes Inégales (pronounced notes inagall). This will be a fun dance! http://www.notesinegales.org/

More information about this upcoming dance: Located at Bethel Grove Community Center. The contra dance starts at 8:00 - 11:00 pm. The street address is 1825 Slaterville Road (Rt 79 about 4 miles east of Ithaca; look for the yellow street sign that says “School”) Ithaca NY. Admission $6- (discounts for students and new dancers). Sponsored by: TCCD - Tompkins County Country Dances 607-273-8678. Don’t miss this celebration of the roots of New England folk dance. This is an authentic Old New England style venue with a newly refinished wooden dance floor. Bring clean shoes, a water bottle and YOUR FRIENDS. All dances taught, No partner needed. http://www.notesinegales.org/

Additional links …

BAND Notes Inégales contra dance band http://www.notesinegales.org/
VENUE http://tedcrane.com/DanceDB/DisplayDance.com?key=US_NY_ITH_TCCD
VENUE’S POSTER http://canaaninstitute.org/photos/TCCD_Insert_current.pdf
FACEBOOK EVENT https://www.facebook.com/events/146715998785801/

DIRECTIONS to this DANCE http://tedcrane.com/DanceDB/DisplayVenue.com?key=US_NY_ITH_BG Bethel Grove Community Center 1825 Slaterville Road (NYS Rt.79) (from Ithaca take State Street east to Rt. 79, about four miles from the Ithaca Commons; a few hundred yards past the Bible Church)

GOOGLE MAP link to VENUE http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode&q=1825+Slaterville+Rd%2C+Ithaca%2C+NY+14850&sll=42.41161%2C-76.29505&sspn=0.008523%2C0.01929&ie=UTF8&hq&hnear=1825+Slaterville+Rd%2C+Ithaca%2C+Tompkins%2C+New+York+14850&ll=42.40552%2C-76.432515&spn=0.034097%2C0.077162&z=14

About the band name: Notes Inégales (pronounced notes inagall) contra dance band http://www.notesinegales.org/ — “In music, notes inégales (French: unequal notes) refers to a performance practice, mainly from the Baroque and Classical music eras, in which some notes with equal written time values are performed with unequal durations, usually as alternating long and short. The practice was especially prevalent in France in the 17th and 18th centuries, with appearances in other European countries at the same time; and it reappeared as the standard performance practice in the 20th century in jazz.” source http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notes_in%C3%A9gales

MORE INFORMATION About Contra Dancing:

http://www.greatmeadowmusic.com/music.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contra_dance
http://tedcrane.com/DanceDB/DisplayDance.com/US_NY_ITH_TCCD
http://hands4dancers.org/
http://www.syracusecountrydancers.org/
http://contra.binghamtondance.org/contra_calendar.htm
http://www.thedancegypsy.com/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTtEOaruqr4
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128273050

NPR: Youth Flock To Contra Dancing — Contra dancing has been around since the 1700s. If you don’t know it — it’s kind of like square dancing but with long lines of dancers. The dance is having a renaissance around the country thanks to a thriving youth scene and incredibly lively acoustic music. Article by Marika Partridge on All Things Considered NPR July 2nd 2010 http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128273050

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Author: Margaret
• Wednesday, June 20th, 2012

TRUMANSBURG NY Sat Jun 30 - Casey Carr calling contra and square dances (she’s gifted at keeping beginners of all ages comfortable and experienced dancers entertained). Lively music (from Celtic to Quebecois to old-time, Scandinavian to French to Middle Eastern) by the amazing O’Shanigans: Tim Ball (fiddle), Phil Robinson (guitar), and Michael Ludgate (mandolin) http://www.oshanigans.org/. Location: Trumansburg Conservatory of Fine Arts, Congress St. just off Main St., downtown T’burg http://tburgconservatory.org/. Suggested donation $10; children under 13 free; discount for families.

Come celebrate the T’burg community and the area dance community together in a splendid historic building. Contra dances have been held for hundreds of years in small town halls such as the Conservatory. Help us revive this tradition in T’burg! The steps are simple, each dance is taught, and you can come without a partner. But please bring clean, soft-soled shoes to protect the lovely wooden floor! Sponsored by the board of the Trumansburg Conservatory of Fine Arts. For info., e-mail mbs19@cornell.edu.

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• Thursday, July 22nd, 2010

Fri JULY 23rd — ITHACA NY — O’Shanigans CONTRA ROOTS party at Bethel Grove! O’Shanigans are back for a fabulous Contra Dance at Bethel Grove Community Center with the phenomenal Ted Crane calling the dances at 1825 Slaterville Road (Rt 79 about 4 miles east of Ithaca) Ithaca NY from 8-11 pm. Don’t miss this celebration of the roots of New England folk dance! This is an authentic Old New England style venue with a newly refinished dance floor! Bring clean shoes, a water bottle and YOUR FRIENDS! All dances taught, No partner needed. Sponsored by: TCCD - Tompkins County Country Dances.

O’Shanigans is Tim Ball on fiddle, Mike Ludgate on mandolin and tenor banjo and Phil Robinson on guitar.

BAND WEBSITE http://www.canaaninstitute.org/oshanigans.html
VENUE WEBSITE http://tedcrane.com/DanceDB/DisplayDance.com?key=US_NY_ITH_TCCD
VENUE’S POSTER http://canaaninstitute.org/photos/TCCD_Insert_current.pdf
BAND’S EVENT POSTER http://canaaninstitute.org/docs/Oshanigans_current_poster.pdf
FACEBOOK EVENT http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=114971911883362

NPR: Youth Flock To Contra Dancing — Contra dancing has been around since the 1700s. If you don’t know it — it’s kind of like square dancing but with long lines of dancers. The dance is having a renaissance around the country thanks to a thriving youth scene and incredibly lively acoustic music. Article by Marika Partridge on All Things Considered NPR July 2nd 2010 http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128273050

DIRECTIONS to this DANCE — http://tedcrane.com/DanceDB/DisplayVenue.com?key=US_NY_ITH_BG Bethel Grove Community Center 1825 Slaterville Road (NYS Rt.79) (from Ithaca take State Street east to Rt. 79, about four miles from the Ithaca Commons; a few hundred yards past the Bible Church) Google Maps http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode&q=1825+Slaterville+Rd%2C+Ithaca%2C+NY+14850&sll=42.41161%2C-76.29505&sspn=0.008523%2C0.01929&ie=UTF8&hq&hnear=1825+Slaterville+Rd%2C+Ithaca%2C+Tompkins%2C+New+York+14850&ll=42.40552%2C-76.432515&spn=0.034097%2C0.077162&z=14

More information About Contra Dancing:
http://www.greatmeadowmusic.com/music.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contra_dance
http://tedcrane.com/DanceDB/DisplayDance.com/US_NY_ITH_TCCD
http://hands4dancers.org/
http://www.syracusecountrydancers.org/
http://contra.binghamtondance.org/contra_calendar.htm
http://www.thedancegypsy.com/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTtEOaruqr4
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128273050

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Author: Guest
• Wednesday, October 14th, 2009

Hot New Local Contra Dance Band Debuts with West Coast Dance Caller

On Friday October 23rd, Ithaca’s hottest new contra dance band, The O’Shanigans, will provide lively traditional world music for a contra dance at Bethel Grove Community Center on Rt. 79 just east of Ithaca NY. The dances will be called by renowned west coast caller Woody Lane. The dance starts promptly at 8:00 pm and runs until 11:00 pm with a short break about halfway through. Admission is only $6.00. All dances are taught from scratch. No partner is needed to attend. Contra dances are held at this venue every Friday. Contra dancing a fun friendly mix-and-match type of dance; always with live fiddle music.

Facebook event page http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=154226023782

Brief description of the band:

The O’Shanigans perform Celtic, American and world fiddle dance tunes suitable for general entertainment and contra dances. The band combines the skills of an incredibly talented young fiddler.with two of Ithaca’s most experienced open music jam leaders. The O’Shanigans is: Tim Ball on fiddle (Contrapasso, Tunescape, Ithaca College violinist and etc), Phil Robinson on guitar (Ithaca Bluegrass jam leader, multi-instrumentalist), and Michael Ludgate on mandolin and tenor banjo (Canaan jam leader, waltz jam originator, Cornell Middle East Ensemble member and etc). The band O’Shanigans was originally formed by Phil Robinson to fill a fun gig for a Saint Patrick’s Day in March of 2009. The band name was coined as a spin off on the word shenanigans and that first Irish gig! Web page http://www.canaaninstitute.org/oshanigans.html Booking: oshanigans@canaaninstitute.org

About the dance caller:

Woody Lane : Dance Caller, Teacher and Percussive Dancer

Woody calls contra, squares, mixers, and circle dances for all levels of dancers, from weddings and community dances to venues for experienced dancers, such as contramanias and weekend dance camps. He generally calls modern contras, although occasional chestnuts are fun, and he enjoy calling smooth, active contras that dancers really enjoy. He can also call good fast squares, and will call one or more in an evening depending on the crowd and the music. His teaching is clear and precise, and he tries to generate excitement and exhilaration on the dance floor.

Woody has called extensively throughout the Pacific Northwest and West Coast and for the past few years has toured across the United States. He has done dances in Denver, Washington DC (Glen Echo), Baltimore, North Carolina (including Brasstown), Georgia, Wisconsin, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky. New York, Anchorage, and many other places around the US and Canada.

Woody used to live in West Virginia, where he was first exposed to the feeling and rhythms of Appalachian music and dance. There, he danced to old-time string music in small community halls in the mountains. he first learned to call in the early 1980’s at the Augusta Heritage Workshops in West Virginia and has been calling dances ever since. Woody has lived and called in Madison, WI and Ithaca, NY. He moved to Oregon in 1990. In the past few years, he has expanded his calling to be on staff at dance and music camps, including Fiddle Tunes, Bear Hug (Montana), and Raincoast Ruckus (Vancouver, BC).

Woody Lane is also an accomplished percussive dancer and will usually do some stepdancing when he calls. He began clogging in the late 1970’s in West Virginia. He taught clogging in Ithaca and was one of the founding members of the famous “Limberjacks” clogging team in New York in the early I 980s. In Wisconsin, he was on the “Kickapoo Cloggers” and was founding member of the “Barking Frog Cloggers” - an eclectic dance troupe that specialized in unusual formations and rhythms. Over the past ten years in Oregon, his dancing has evolved into a more complex style of flatfooting that adds a rhythmic accompaniment to the music. In the Pacific Northwest, he is well-known for his percussive dance, and will join bands as a percussive element. At festivals and dances, he often teaches percussive dance workshops that include clogging, flatfooting, rhythms, and waltz clog.

More about Contra Dancing:

WHAT TO EXPECT AT YOUR FIRST DANCE Contra dancing is easy to learn. It’s so easy to learn that you don’t take lessons. Just show up at a dance and by the end of the first night you’ll have learned all the dance moves and you will be able to enjoy the next dance even more. People are friendly and welcoming to beginners. The age range is from kids to folks that have been around for a while. Both singles and doubles come to contra dances and women as well as men ask people to dance. It is usual that you change partners after every dance. You will meet people in a relaxed, pleasant, smoke and alcohol free atmosphere. The patterns of the dance can be a tad confusing at first but remember everyone had a first time and that other dancers will help you. Listen to the caller and the music and go with the flow of the dance. Some people find they get dizzy at first. Looking directly at the person you are dancing with eliminates this sensation. For many, the music is what keeps them coming back as it is exciting and lively. People come to dance, hear the music, socialize and have a good time.

WHAT TO WEAR? Wear smooth soled shoes and comfortable light weight clothing. Some halls require non-street shoes so make sure the soles of shoes aren’t bringing grit onto the dance floor. Most people bring a bottle of drinking water. Contra dancing is joyous so it’s important that you bring a smile. [ source http://www.greatmeadowmusic.com/music.html ]

More INFO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contra_dance

Locally http://tedcrane.com/DanceDB/DisplayDance.com/US_NY_ITH_TCCD

and http://hands4dancers.org/

More details about O’Shanigans band members – all currently reside in Ithaca NY area:

Phil Robinson - [ Guitar with O'Shanigans, also mandolin, fiddle, sitar and 5-string banjo ] Phil’s grandmother and mother both played piano and sang, and his father played saxophone in a swing band. His family noticed early on that Phil had perfect pitch, so they encouraged him to learn piano and music theory as a young child and even bought him a baby grand piano on which to practice. He competed in National Piano Players Guild auditions and earned several honorary certificates as a boy. In elementary school, Phil learned recorder, baritone horn, and tenor sax as well.

As he degenerated into a rebellious teen, Phil thought electric guitar would be way cooler than anything, so at 13 he bought a bizarre bright blue electric with dozens of semi-functional buttons to play with. He managed to plug it into his mom’s 8-track tape player and use it as his first amplifier. Hard rock was his earliest influence, with Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin, Angus Young of AC/DC, and Alex Lifeson of Rush being his favorite guitarists to try to emulate. Phil took a few lessons but mostly practiced scales and chords endlessly, whiling away several hours a day, many years in a row, from junior high school through grad school.

After the initial funky guitar, Phil acquired a Fender Jazzmaster, then a Gibson Les Paul Standard, and finally a gorgeous red Fender Stratocaster that he still plays today. In high school and college, Phil played with various rock cover bands. He started to enjoy jam bands like the Grateful Dead and Phish, learned many of their songs, and he loves soloing to that kind of music. Also, Phil started to get serious about learning classical guitar, playing pieces by Heitor Villa-Lobos, Isaac Albeniz, Bach, Fernando Sor, and many other composers.

With some semblance of maturity settling in recently, Phil got into Old-Time, bluegrass, Celtic, Cajun, zydeco, and contra dance music. And since everyone and his/her canine plays the guitar in Ithaca, Phil decided to branch out and teach himself fiddle, mandolin, 5-string banjo, and sitar (out of an appreciation for classical Indian music). Phil leads a local bluegrass jam and he sometimes attends Jay Ungar and Molly Mason’s Ashokan Fiddle and Dance camps (Southern Week). Monday evenings in the summer, Phil makes regular appearances with Your Friends and Neighbors at the contra dances on the Ithaca Commons.

Tim Ball - [ Fiddle ] Tim Ball plays fiddle in Contrapasso and Tunescape, and is frequently heard entertaining audiences and lifting the feet of dancers across central New York in the company of these groups and many other fine musicians. A recent graduate of the Ithaca College School of Music where he studied violin with Susan Waterbury, he brings training in classical music and jazz improvization together with a love of social dancing and a great respect for the traditional music of New England, Ireland, Quebec, and the many other regions that have lent their influence to contra dance musicians everywhere.

Tim’s first instrument was the tin whistle. He began taking violin lessons when he was 9, and almost immediately began to teach himself the traditional tunes that he had learned on the whistle. Around the time that he started college, he started to play regularly with the Monday night open band in Ithaca. Eventually he and pianist Roberta Truscello formed Contrapasso. That was truly a “gateway” experience; he has been performing with many musicians around the region ever since.

Michael Ludgate - [ Mandolin with O'Shanigans, also fiddle and Irish tenor banjo ] Michael comes from a long local line of Ithaca musicians. His grandfather Moe Harper was a local jazz clarinet and tenor saxophone player in the Ithaca area in the 1940’s through the 1960’s Moe’s wife Ina, played violin in a more classical style. Mike’s mother Roberta played flute and piano and was popular as a piano accompanist for a variety of musical tasks. Mike remembers vividly the barbershop quartets training in the living room as a child with coaching from his mom. This was the beginning of Michael’s musical education. He always tinkers with the keys of any keyboard he walks by, but never took a lesson - he says he wishes he did. He started on trombone in 4th grade at the public schools in Dryden NY .. taking some lessons from one of his grandfather’s jazz friends, Woody Peters along the way. When his sister took up flute, he just couldn’t resist noodling with woodwinds and started playing scales and simple tunes on flute and saxophone and clarinet.

This instrumental distraction continues today; Michael picked up his grandmother’s violin in 2002 and taught himself to read treble clef with help from a Suzuki book. Then his spouse took pity on him (or herself) and offered to pay for lessons. He took lessons on violin from Rebecca Geiger Hamlin for three years and at that same time started hosting the weekly Wednesday fiddle tune jam from his home. He also plays rudimentary guitar, thanks to Phil Shapiro’s guitar class. Mike has studied Irish tenor banjo, with thanks to Harry Lawless of Traonach. He learned the basics of playing fiddle tunes for contra dancers from Ted Crane and Pamela Goddard’s many open band opportunities. Michael started the Upstate NY area’s only waltz band a couple years ago - this is an open band that plays once per month at the Bethel Grove Contra dances. Most recently Michael has developed a passion for mandolin which he plays mostly melodically in a Celtic style with some New England, bluegrass and old-time influence with thanks to Phil Banaszak, Tod Sukontarak and Tom Quigley. Michael loves and supports the open bands and open acoustic jams around the Ithaca area and attends many of them when time permits. Michael hosts a weekly contra tune jam (open jam) at his home in Brooktondale NY. Michael is also currently a member of the Cornell Middle Eastern Music Ensemble (CMEMME) where he studies Armenian, Turkish and other Middle Eastern fiddle styles under Harold Hagopian.

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Author: Margaret
• Thursday, October 23rd, 2008

Big contra dance with renowned New England band Wild Asparagus, George Marshall calling, at B. J. Martin School, 302 W. Buffalo St., Ithaca. 3:30-5:30 pm, session for experienced dancers; 5:45 pm potluck; 7:30-8:00 pm instruction for newcomers; 8:00-11:30 pm dancing for all. No partner needed. Clean, soft-soled shoes, please. Info: 607-273-7076 or visit www.hands4dancers.org.

Springing up in the 1980s in the heart of the Pioneer Valley, Asparagus Capital of Massachusetts, the renowned band WILD ASPARAGUS has been vital in the contra dance renaissance. Their monthly “first-Saturdays” at Greenfield (dance mecca) are packed. Over the years, these top musicians have put their individual stamp on traditional tunes from New England, Canada, the wider Celtic world, and beyond. Their hallmark is playfulness: imaginative arrangements and dynamic pacing that draw on sources from medieval Brittany to pop to hot Latin grooves. You won’t want to miss this unique blend of skilled musicianship, creativity, and energy! Becky Tracy on fiddle shows incomparable flow and soul; David Cantieni, woodwind wizard, provides exuberant melody with flutes, tin whistle, oboe, saxophone, and bombard; Ann Percival on piano, guitar, and vocals is the essential heartbeat of the band; George Marshall, gifted at English concertina, bodhran, and bones, brings drive and does double duty as a caller renowned for simple, elegant teaching and an excellent selection of dances.

Wild Asparagus playing music with George Marshall calling; a Contra dance Hands sponsored by Four Dancers of Ithaca  Saturday, 25 October, 3:30-5:30 (experienced dancers) and 8:00-11:30 pm  Beverly J. Martin School, 302 West Buffalo Street, Ithaca. A newcomers’ [dance] workshop at 7:30 pm will cover basic steps and patterns. All dances taught. Bring clean, soft-soled shoes to protect the floor. And bring a dish-to-pass for a potluck at 5:45 pm. Info: 607-273-7076 or www.hands4dancers.org Both sessions, $12 members/$15 nonmembers; afternoon only, $6/$8; evening only, $9/$12.

– Margaret Shepard

FORUM THREAD FOR THIS GROUP http://canaaninstitute.org/mikesmusic/viewtopic.php?p=2039#2039

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• Thursday, October 09th, 2008

Syracuse’s annual dance weekend, the Phylla Mae Fall Fest: Friday & Saturday October 17 & 18. Location is Syracuse’s usual contradance location: United Church of Fayetteville, 310 E. Genesee St., Fayetteville, NY

Don’t miss the fun as the Syracuse Country Dancers present the eleventh annual Phylla Mae Fall Fest: their fall weekend festival of dance and music. This year’s multitalented performers include Nils Fredland (dance caller), Firetruck (Ethan Hazard-Watkins, fiddle; Anna Patton, clarinet; Karen Axelrod, piano), Contranella (Megan Beller, fiddle; Charley Beller, strings and percussion; John Wobus, piano), and many more. The weekend will be packed with dancing, jamming, and workshops related to contra, square, and English country dancing. Join us Friday evening and all day Saturday, October 17-18 at the United Church of Fayetteville, 310 E. Genesee Street in Fayetteville, NY. For further information, call 315-472-0576 or go to links below.

Featured caller is Nils Fredland, with calling by Ithaca’s Katy Heine and Pamela Goddard, as well as David Smukler. Featuring Firetruck: Ethan Hazzard-Watkins on fiddle, Anna Patton on clarinet (they play together in a number of bands such as Elixer and Beeswax Sheepskin and have played for both Rochester’s and Binghamton’s dance weekends) and Karen Axelrod on Piano. Also featuring Contranella: Megan Beller on fiddle, John Wobus on piano and Charley Beller on percussion and mandolin.

Friday:
Dancing begins at 7:30PM with Firetruck, Nils Fredland calling.

Saturday:
10:30AM-Noon: Contradance with Nils Fredland and Contranella, -or- A musician’s workshop by the members of Firetruck.
1:00PM-4:30PM: Open Jamming! (hosted by John Wobus)
1:00PM-2:30PM: Singing Squares with Nils Fredland and Firetruck
2:45PM-4:15PM: Contradance with Katie Heine and Firetruck
4:30PM-6:00PM: English Country Dance with Pamela Goddard and Contranella
7:00PM-8:30PM: English Country Dance with David Smukler and Firetruck
8:30PM-Midnight: Contradance with Nils Fredland, Contranella, and Firetruck

FESTIVAL WEBSPACE http://www.syracusecountrydancers.org/PhyllaMaeFallFest.html
FORUM THREAD HERE http://canaaninstitute.org/mikesmusic/viewtopic.php?p=1872#1872

DIRECTIONS FROM ITHACA — Location: United Church of Fayetteville, 310 E Genesee St, Fayetteville (Syracuse Country Dancer’s normal weekly location).  Directions: Approaching Syracuse from the south on I81 north, take I481 east, then go east (right) on East Genessee Street for 2.6 miles into the village of Fayetteville. Church is on the right with parking in the rear. About an hour and fifteen minutes from Cornell.

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• Thursday, September 25th, 2008
This jam session started many years ago at my home near Hammond Hill with myself and a cello player learning duets. (Well … I was learning). I discovered in the year or so to follow that I loved fiddle tunes and especially dance tunes. The melodies played for what we now-a-days call contra dancing integrate some of the greatest variety of traditional music from the USA, Canada, British Isles and parts of Northern Europe like Norway, Sweden and France along with “neo-traditional” tunes written in a traditional style. These are the tunes we play: Irish, French Canadian, New England, Southern Old Time, Celtic …

The jam started as a “slow jam” but now the speed of the tunes is often close to dance speed (~115 steps or beats per minute is “dance speed”) while maintaining a learning atmosphere: sheet music is available [ we work from the Your Friends and Neighbors YFN tune set ] for all tunes played and mp3s are available for many - bring a recorder! We take turns and go around the circle choosing tunes - so everyone gets to pick a favorite. We make an effort to announce the name of the tune and what key it is in to help for later study …

All instruments welcome - we have actually been short on guitars lately for example! Email Mike for directions michael@canaaninstitute.org

See you some Wednesday soon!
Mike

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